Milestones

1989

Stags Leap District

The Stags Leap District is established as an American Viticultural Area.

Often referred to as a "valley within a valley," the district is bounded on the east by the towering Stags Leap Palisades, to the west by the gently rolling hills and the Napa River, to the north by the Yountville Cross Road, and to the south by low-lying flatlands. There is a great diversity of soils within the Stags Leap District of Napa Valley but two main types predominate. Soils on the eastern elevation are the result of volcanic eruptions that took place millions of years ago, as well as the slow erosion of the arid Vaca Mountains. In the lowland area, where a much broader Napa River once ran, old river sediments have created a remarkable blend of loams with a clay-like substructure. These gravely soils, and those of the hillsides, are coarser and retain less water than most resulting in low-vigor vines that yield fruit of great intensity and flavor—the "rock soft" wines of the Stags Leap District.