Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars

Collector’s Corner

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars

Welcome to the Collector’s Corner, a forum for exchanging information and points of view about our wines, our winemaking and vineyard activities, and our wines at auction.

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Age Appropriate

Here’s one of the biggest myths about wine: It gets better if you age it. While some wines (like Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars “CASK 23” Cabernet Sauvignon) unquestionably do evolve in compelling and fascinating ways over time, there is actually no basis to the presumption that wine de facto gets better the longer you keep it. Sadly, I know this all too well from experience.

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Tinajas: A Lost Art

Many visitors to our Napa Valley winery comment on the three large earthenware vessels they see on “The Outlook,” the grassy knoll overlooking our FAY vineyard and the Stags Leap Palisades. These beautiful Spanish vessels, purchased from an antique art dealer, are known as tinajas (pronounced tee-na-ha), and at one time were used for aging and storing wine.

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A Bottle Fitting a Revolution: Limited Edition CASK 23 Release

The 30th anniversary of the 1976 Paris Tasting, in which our 1973 Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon bested some of the top- rated French Bordeaux of the day, has been celebrated with numerous retrospective tastings and reenactments for wine writers, judges and members of the wine trade. Now, we’re delighted to mark this historic event with the release of 73 limited edition 3-litre commemorative bottles of our 2003 CASK 23 Cabernet Sauvignon.

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Auction Action: 2007 Premiere Napa Valley

Each year in February, Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars participates in Premiere Napa Valley, a trade-only barrel tasting and auction of one-of-a-kind lots from Napa Valley vintners. A sell-out crowd of wine retailers, restaurateurs, and wholesalers vie for the winning bid on these rare lots.

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Common Sense(s)

Because wines are so dynamic – because they constantly change and evolve, particularly when they are young – the sensory evaluation of wine is a critical aspect of the winemaking process. For Winemaker Nicki Pruss, the task requires nearly all of her senses and a good deal ­of stamina, as she continually evaluates dozens of vineyard lots – kept separate throughout maturity – for color, aromas, flavors and textures. "I look at a wine as a whole entity, then dissect it by its component parts," says Nicki.

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